Fugitive in the Woodwork ~ wood sculpture photo print

Wood carving mask over woodcolor pallet, photo print on canvas by Peter
Wood carving mask over woodcolor palette, photo print on canvas by Peter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This one made itself over the course of two years.  First, I carved a life-size mask in fir of a Nara period face drawing.  Here it was:

sculpture inspired by Nara period theatrical mask
Wood Sculpture by Peter, 2013
click on photo to enlarge details

 

 

Then what?  I used it in the Head Case.  Here’s what that looked like:

head case on used barrel ~ 3 wood carvings inspired by Nara period gigaku masks.  Sculptor Peter Neibert. Click on photo to enlarge.
head case on used barrel ~ 3 wood carvings inspired by Nara period gigaku masks. Sculptor Peter Neibert. Click on photo to enlarge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then I let it sit for a year while I worked on other things.

When painting wood sculpture during this period, I cleaned brushes, rags, knives on the inside of a utility closet door.  If I were a formal painter I would call this panel my wood palette for the time.  Here’s a picture of that:

Woodcolor pallet
Palette of the time

 

Meanwhile I took another cut at the Nara fugitive, so then it looked something like this.

Nara Fugitive mask in rework
Nara Fugitive takes a break from modeling work in Head Shed

And then I took many looks at the two pictures (and countless derivatives) in Photoshop — the result is the image at the top of this post.

The biggest image my printer can make is 13″ wide and maybe as much as 28″ long.   Any bigger, means I have to take it out to a real printer.

 

By Peter Neibert, Kentfield, California, 2014

Author: Peter Neibert

I carve stone & wood sculpture, and photograph ikebana, pictographs, landscapes and my own sculptures. I browse my images on screen until one of them speaks to me. Then I work-up something in Photoshop. Often, I do nothing with it for a long time -- perhaps until another browsing trail leads me back to it. So, it might become a simple inkjet print, or a Photoshop project, or a carving -- often I take pictures of the work-in-progress, and work them into the progress of the work. My studio is in Kentfield, California.

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