Survivor ~ Woodsculpture WIP

A character I saw one morning on Telegraph Avenue (Oakland, California) inspired The Survivor .

"Survivor" & heads/faces, WIP 2014;  wood sculpture, fir, 2014, by Peter Neibert
“Survivor” & heads/faces, WIP 2014; woodsculpture, fir, 2014, by Peter Neibert

I don’t remember his face, so I am carving five interchangeable masks to fit on the torso.

His arms hold four masks as he tries on each to choose the right one to get through the morning.

 

I began thinking about The Survivor torso a long time ago.

It’s carved out of a used beam I found in the back yard of Fairfax Lumber company.

I took it home in my jeep and let it dry in my garage for several months before I started work.

The picture at left shows what The Survivor #Woodsculpture looked like recently.

Here  is what the first cut looked like:  http://neibert.com/portfolio/wip-waiting-at-the-workshop-door/

WIP: Waiting at the Workshop Door

roughed-in, reclaimed 5' beam
Just roughed-in, reclaimed 5′ beam (8 x 10)

“Do you sense how all the parts of a good picture are involved with each other.  Not just placed side by side?  Art is a creation for the eye and can only be hinted at with words.”    — John Baldessari, 1968

There is no formula. There are no rules. Let the picture lead you where it must go.

—Helen Frankenthaler, New York Times interview, 2003

“Color is not an easy matter.”
— Umberto Eco, 1985.

“Color and texture in painting are ends in themselves. They are the essence of painting, but this essence has always been destroyed by the subject.”
— Kasimir Malevich.

Richard Diebenkorn on “rightness”

“I attempt to make the lines and shapes right and because spatiality is intrinsic to a line-shape continuum, it too must be dealt with — made right….
One’s sense of rightness includes absolutely the whole person and hopefully others in some basic sense. What is important to artistic communication is only this basic part but if the artist doesn’t make his work right he has no idea what he has left out.”
The Art of Richard Diebenkorn p. 87

“Miles Davis bends the notes. He doesn’t play them, he bends them. I bend the paint.”
— Willem de Kooning

“Paintings and sculptures, let us observe, are the last hand-made, personal objects within our culture. Almost everything else is produced industrially, in mass, and through a high division of labor. Few people are fortunate enough to make something that represents themselves, that issues entirely from their hands and mind, and to which they can affix their names.”
The Liberating Quality of Avant-Garde Art Meyer Schapiro

“Pure draughtsmen are philosophers and distillers of quintessentials. Colorist are epic poets.”
–Charles Baudelaire, 1846.

“When I am in a painting, I’m not aware of what I’m doing. It is only after a sort of ‘get acquainted’ period that I see what I have been about. I have no fears about making changes, destroying the image, etc., because the painting has a life of its own. I try to let it come through. It is only when I lose contact with the painting that the result is a mess. Otherwise there is pure harmony, an easy give and take, and the painting comes out well.”
— Jackson Pollock, 1949

“Art is art-as-art and everything else is everything else.”
— Ad Reinhardt, 1962

“What you see is what you see.”
— Frank Stella, 1964