Survivor on Telegraph Avenue WIP1601b

Wood Sculpture Survivor Telegraph Ave
Survivor Telegraph Ave Oakland
Survivor on Telegraph Avenue in Oakland holds Fugitive mask with interior consciousness, while swallowing head — Survivor’s tentative selection for the day.

Wood sculpture (48 lbs, 50″ tall), oil stain, flame, acrylic, pastel), digital combine.

Detail of Masks are here

Guardian ~ Sego Pictographs in the Barrier Canyon Style

The Sego Canyon rock paintings are new, perhaps painted only seven hundred years ago.

I’ve photographed them several times in morning and evening light.   This image is my favorite:

Guardian: Sego Canyon, photo by Peter Neibert
Guardian: Sego Canyon, photo by Peter Neibert

Under a clear Utah sky the noontime sun is so strong it washes out all the color ~  sometimes you can’t see anything in the stone at all.

Other times I get enough of the right light and shadow to pull out shape and color.  Red, yellow ochre and black.

These Sego Canyon  figures seem familiar.

 

 

 

 

Their style and shape recall the 5,500 year old Barrier Canyon paintings — just a hundred miles distant.  We don’t know who were the ancient Barrier Canyon peoples who created them.  Each new discoverer saw something different and profound in the oldest images.

Holy Ghost Group, Great Gallery, Barrier Canyon (Horseshoe Canyon) photo by Peter Neibert
Holy Ghost Group, Great Gallery, Barrier Canyon (Horseshoe Canyon) photo by Peter Neibert

 

 

Holy Ghost Central Group detail, photo and PS by Peter Neibert
Holy Ghost Central Group detail, photo and PS by Peter Neibert

 

Fugitive in the Woodwork ~ wood sculpture photo print

Wood carving mask over woodcolor pallet, photo print on canvas by Peter
Wood carving mask over woodcolor palette, photo print on canvas by Peter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This one made itself over the course of two years.  First, I carved a life-size mask in fir of a Nara period face drawing.  Here it was:

sculpture inspired by Nara period theatrical mask
Wood Sculpture by Peter, 2013
click on photo to enlarge details

 

 

Then what?  I used it in the Head Case.  Here’s what that looked like:

head case on used barrel ~ 3 wood carvings inspired by Nara period gigaku masks.  Sculptor Peter Neibert. Click on photo to enlarge.
head case on used barrel ~ 3 wood carvings inspired by Nara period gigaku masks. Sculptor Peter Neibert. Click on photo to enlarge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then I let it sit for a year while I worked on other things.

When painting wood sculpture during this period, I cleaned brushes, rags, knives on the inside of a utility closet door.  If I were a formal painter I would call this panel my wood palette for the time.  Here’s a picture of that:

Woodcolor pallet
Palette of the time

 

Meanwhile I took another cut at the Nara fugitive, so then it looked something like this.

Nara Fugitive mask in rework
Nara Fugitive takes a break from modeling work in Head Shed

And then I took many looks at the two pictures (and countless derivatives) in Photoshop — the result is the image at the top of this post.

The biggest image my printer can make is 13″ wide and maybe as much as 28″ long.   Any bigger, means I have to take it out to a real printer.

 

By Peter Neibert, Kentfield, California, 2014

Sego Canyon: Combine D2

“Sego Canyon, Combine D2” (multimedia) wall-hanging derives from  ancient, native American pictographs.

Acrylic on reclaimed redwood, masks carved in fir, pictographic digital photos printed on canvas; dimensions: 20in w x 30in h x 7in deep; wood, acrylic, canvas, plexiglas
Sego Canyon: Combine D2 (Mixed Media wall-hanging)

Acrylic on reclaimed redwood, masks carved in fir scrap, pictographic digital photos printed on canvas (digital inkjet);

  • Dimensions: 20 inches wide x 30 inches high x 7 inches deep;
  • Material: wood, acrylic, digital photos, canvas, plexiglas (translucent over white wall)

Sego Canyon pictographs are probably about 700 years old.  These paintings on desert stone are loosely (and incorrectly) characterized) as Anasazi.  It is more likely that these were made by unknown tribe(s) after the Anasazi disappearance from the Colorado Plateau (circa 1100 – 1275 c.e.).

Significantly, the style of the Sego panels is clearly influenced by the 5,000 year old pictographs in Barrier Canyon — about 100 miles distant.

Photography by Peter Neibert